Welcome to my blog

I was born in Guernsey (but now live in Brittany) and our main industry was growing tomatoes although that industry has now virtually disappeared. Growing tomatoes to a Guernseyman is like wine to a Frenchman, it's in our blood! I do not profess to be an expert, but I have picked up a few tips and techniques which work for me.
PLEASE NOTE due to ill health I have not kept up with this blog, however there is still a lot of information to look at from over the past few years. I will add the odd new post but some videos are missing from old post, I will re-create these one day.


Friday, 1 February 2013

Litchi Tomatoes Recipes

Here are a few recipes and ideas of how you can use Litchi tomatoes which I have managed to find on various websites. Please email me if you have any that are not listed

 The flavor of the ripe fruit. It's most similar to the sweeter types of cherry tomatoes (think Sungold), but it has hints of sour cherry and watermelon. Apparently the flavour improves and gets more fruity later in the season, as a result of the cooler weather so it seems.


The Litchi tomato combines the flavours of a sour cherry and a small tomato, lending a unique taste to recipes. Tomatoes can be roasted halved or whole, drizzled with olive oil and served with crusty bread. Another alternative is to cook the fruit, strain the seeds out and puree it to create a paste that can be added to recipes as a thickener and seasoning agent. Tasty chutney or salsa recipes can be prepared using the tomatoes in addition to other fruits or vegetables. Litchi tomatoes can also be substituted for cherry tomatoes or sour cherries in both savoury and sweet recipes, such as pies or tarts, sorbets or jams.
Source  Essortment



Litchi Tomatoes in a baby spinach, arugula and blueberry salad with a minty dressing.








 

 Hot and Spicy Litchi Tomato Chutney: Recipe from  Mother Earth News

Four cups green tomatoes, sliced into small shreds, measure after slicing; 
 2 1⁄2 cups whole Litchi tomatoes, hulls removed; 
 6 dates, seeded and coarsely chopped; 
4 garlic cloves, each sliced into 4 pieces 
lengthwise; 
zest of 2 limes; 
1 tbsp or more hot pepper, finely minced; 
1/2 cup white vinegar; 
2 tsp mustard seed, crushed to meal-like consistency; 
1 tsp fennel seed, preferably Indian Luck now fennel; 
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon; 
1 tsp cumin seed
; 1 cup green raisins; 
1 cup chopped mango or under-ripe peach; 
1 cup slivered almonds; 
2 1⁄2 cups honey or 3 cups sugar.

Combine all ingredients in a deep pan and cook over medium-high heat for 20 minutes, or until thick. Remove from the heat and lift out the fruit mixture with a slotted spoon and put it into hot, sanitized preserve jars standing in hot water. Reduce the remaining syrup over high heat until thick like honey, and then pour this over the hot fruit and seal. Allow to mellow two weeks before using. Yields approximately four 12-ounce jars.

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